Colloquia
< 2017>
January, 13th
CHARLES MARCUS
February, 3rd
LUIS LIZ-MARZAN
February, 27th
ALEXANDER FETTER
March, 30th
PHILIP KIM
April, 4th
MARC KASTNER
May, 22nd
IGNACIO CIRAC
May, 26th
KIP THORNE
September, 1st
WOLFGANG KETTERLE
November, 24th
BRIAN W. POGUE
December, 1st
MONIKA RITSCH-MARTE

Trapped Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensates

ALEXANDER FETTER
February 27th, 2017 ALEXANDER FETTER Professor Emeritus, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Stanford University
Profile

Alexander Fetter is Professor Emeritus of Physics and Applied Physics at Stanford University. His current problems of interest include vortex dynamics on curved surfaces and in trapped coherently coupled Bose-Einstein condensates. Fetter graduated with a B.A. from Williams College in 1958, where he was valedictorian. He was also a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College of Oxford University, and then went on to receive a PhD in Physics at Harvard University in 1963. He spent two years at the University of California, Berkeley as a Miller Postdoctoral fellow. In 1965, he joined the faculty at Stanford University, and has been there since. He served as chair of the Physics Department from 1985 to 1990. Fetter is a fellow of the American Physical Society and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served as the director of the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and the Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials. During his career at Stanford, he received three awards for teaching, culminating in the Stanford Dean’s Award for Lifetime Achievements in Teaching (2008). Abstract After reviewing the basic physics of Bose-Einstein condensation, I discuss the non-linear Gross-Pitaevskii equation that provides a good description of a trapped dilute condensate. Here the interest is the rotational properties of the condensate, especially the role of quantized vortex lines. For slow rotations, only a few vortices appear, but as the angular velocity increases, the vortices form a triangular lattice that is analogous to the Abrikosov vortex lattices in type-II superconductors. Eventually the system enters the lowest Landau level regime where the mean interaction energy per particle is small compared to the energy gap separating the first and second Landau levels. For very fast rotations, theorists predict a quantum phase transition to a non-superfluid highly correlated state analogous to those seen in the quantum Hall regime for two-dimensional electrons in a strong magnetic field.


Monday, February 27, 12:00, ICFO Auditorium